Running Salmon

spawning salmon melodie-grabner-watercolour-5

Fish, especially salmon run in my blood.  My father was a fisherman. He moved from landlocked Manitoba, land of 1000 lakes to the west coast of BC in 1933; escaping the depression. My parents and my three older sisters lived on the ocean for 20 years, until I was born and my mom said that’s enough.

daddy-hector-lawrence-bowen-island

This weekend, we made our pilgrimage to Adams River to witness the annual salmon run. 2015  is a subdominant  year when you can see 100,000+ sockeye return to spawn in October (and maybe a bear or two).

IMG_8794

The next big year will be in 2018, where you can see millions of salmon return.

spawning salmon-melodie-grabner-watercolour-1

I like to go every year as it is a pilgrimage to impermanence. The salmon come to spawn and die.

IMG_8781

Sadly, this beautiful life cycle could also be dying. Hindered by global warming, urban encroachment and overfishing,  salmon numbers are dwindling. From the days of my dad when a 60 pound chinook was common place, today it would be a rarity for a sport fisherman, and you would have to go the Haida Gwaii to catch it.

Just as I now live on a riparian stream and do my best to keep it natural, I hate to think that only my paintings will be left for my great-grandchildren, when my father left me the ocean.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s